HomeRobotic Database - Show all infrastructures | TERRINet

All available infrastructures

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The BioRobotics Institute

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The BioRobotics Institute of of Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, founded in 2011, has built a vast wealth of knowledge and expertise in several fields of biorobotics, such as: assistive/rehabilitation/surgical robotics, neural engineering, cognitive systems, bio-inspired and soft robots, social robotics and industrial robotics. Biorobotics is a highly interdisciplinary, scientific-technological area, which merges robotics and biomedical engineering; in particular it is the science and the technology of the design and development of bioinspired robotics systems with biomedical application.At present the Institute includes over 200 people: 23 faculty members, 90+ PhD students, 75+ research associates, 20+ technicians and administrative staff members, and a variable number of master students and visiting researchers. The headquarter of the BioRobotics Institute is hosted at the Polo Sant’Anna Valdera (PSV) established by the Sant’Anna School, in 2002, as a 6,300 square meters surface research park, in the industrial town of Pontedera (by train: 15 minutes away from Pisa and 45 minutes from Florence). The PSV is home of world class equipment for analysis, design and (micro-nano) fabrication and advanced robotics platforms developed by the research teams as well as classrooms and a guest house.

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Interactive Robotics Lab

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The aim of the Interactive Robotics Lab (LRI) is to design and develop ICT and robotics solutions to provide support and assistance to citizens in daily life activities. Particularly the studies carried out in the “Active and Assisted Living” field aims to integrate robotics, internet, cloud, mobile and electronic technologies for applications, such as healthcare, agriculture, logistic and manufacture. The main scientific challenges to enhance the abilities and capabilities of robotic systems revolve around the physical and cognitive human robot interaction, the integration in intelligent environments and the dependable design. LRI institute is responsible for the development, integration and transfer of robotics technologies to industry.LRI is tightly involved in CEA’s Advanced Manufacturing research programme. Specialized originally in remote handling for operations in hazardous environments (nuclear, underwater applications), the LRI has now a large part of its activities devoted to manufacturing in that respect the robotics lab is deeply involved in innovation of the European industry.The laboratory has an historical background in robotics for Healthcare applications including assistive, surgical robotics and rehabilitation robotics. One part of the laboratory’s activities dedicates to field robotics essentially for agricultural applications. Its main research foci carry on human robot collaboration (co-working). The technological researches cover mechatronics and the conception of actuators for the design of innovative robotics systems, robot control, supervision and user assistances (force, haptic, vision, graphic, immersive feedback) aiming at an efficient human robots collaboration in all domains of applications.

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The Department of Robotics of LAAS

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The Robotics (ROB) Scientific Department conducts research along several themes involving perception, decision-making, motion, action, communication and interaction between the robot and its environment: the other robots, humans and ambient intelligence systems. Research is conducted by ROB along four strategic streams: aerial and terrestrial field robotics, interactive and cognitive robotics, human and anthropomorphic motion, and algorithms for molecular motion. These research activities involve also collaborative investigations with research on living systems such as neuroscience, cognitive sciences and biochemistry.One main feature of robotics research at LAAS concerns the robot itself as an object of study i.e. an artificial entity endowed with integrated sensori-motor and cognitive abilities and acting in an open environment.

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High Performance Humanoid Technologies Lab (H2T)

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The infrastructure offered by the Chair of High Performance Humanoid Technologies consists of several state of the art humanoid robot systems and humanoid components used in research projects and education. The first major part of the infrastructure is the KIT robot kitchen environment, in which the robots ARMAR-IIIa and ARMAR-IIIb are operating. The installation provide unique opportunities to conduct research in the areas of grasping and dexterous manipulation in human-centered environment, visuo-haptic object exploration and learning from human observation and from experience. The second major part of the infrastructure is the KIT Motion Capture Studio, which provide a unique environment for capturing and analysis of human motion and thus support research in the area of learning from human observation and robot programming by demonstration. The users of the infrastructure have access to the expertise of the scientific staff of not only the Chair of High Performance Humanoid Technologies but also of other employees of the Institute of Anthropomatics and Robotics and the KIT Center Information – Systems – Technologies, which bundles interdisciplinary competences across KIT, in particular from informatics, economics, electrical and mechanical engineering, information technology, as well as social science. This is especially important considering the competences at KCIST, which range like machine intelligence, robotics, human-machine interfaces, algorithmics, software engineering, cyber security, cloud computing and scientific computing, secure communication systems, and big data technologies.

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Robotics and Embedded Systems

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The Technical University of Munich Competence Center (TUM CC) will be part of the Chair of Robotics and Embedded Systems Group, Department of Informatics. The TUM CC consists of over 400 sqm of indoor space, which can be used for experimental testing of human-robot interaction and cooperative manufacturing (main area of focus of the Center), for operation of mobile (including aerial) robots, and test of automotive systems. The main part of the infrastructure offered by TUM CC is a collaborative, human-robot manufacturing environment. The setup consists of several robotic arms (Staubli TX70 and TX90, ABB IRB 120, KUKA LRB iiwa), end-effectors (including human-robot interaction safe KUKA R800 gripper), mobile robotic platforms (Robotino) and an experimental setup corresponding to a collaborative manufacturing cell, equipped with a tactile SAPARO floor. The modular manufacturing system can be easily configured to implement a range of manufacturing and robot manipulation scenarios involving both industrial robots and human operators. The installation is particularly useful for research on human-robot cooperation, multi-robot object manipulation, human tracking and detection for ensuring safety, etc. It provides unique opportunities to perform research in manipulative and collaborative robotics with bleeding edge robotic sensors, and a number of different manipulators, including human-safe ones.

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iCub Facility

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The iCub laboratory space hosts several research lines providing support on all aspects related to the robot design, modification, fabrication, programming and use in the daily research activities. Our skilled personnel consists of about 80 people, 60% of which involved in research, the remainder dedicated to engineering and administration. This same group is also supporting the iCub community at large managing a software repository of more than 5M lines of C++ code and about 150 active users. The laboratory presently sports four iCubs in different configurations as well as the machinery required to assemble, maintain and run the robots, measurement and calibration devices, and the ICT infrastructure. The iCub laboratory is 500m2. The Facility is equipped with the ICT infrastructure to run software repositories both open and protected depending on the project confidentiality level. This infrastructure is complemented by IIT’s central facilities, which include a mechanical workshop equipped with state of the art CDC machines.IIT has milling machines for various standard jobs but also rapid prototyping machines for metal (laser sintering), polymers (e.g. ABS) and other tooling equipment as needed to build almost any robot directly in-house. An electronic workshop is available. Trained personnel complement the infrastructure at all levels (e.g. electronics reworking, robot maintenance, etc.). The iCub laboratory has one room equipped with a gantry system (for walking iCubs) and a 10-camera Vicon motion capture to monitor and record the robot’s performance. IIT has additional equipment for motion capture (e.g. Optotrak) as well as for human behavioural recording (e.g. gaze tracking).

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Department of Robotics

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Robotics and Mechatronics (RaM) deals with application of modern systems and control methods to practical situations. Focus is on robotics, as a specific class of mechatronic systems. The research is embedded in the CTIT and MIRA institutes. The research of the group is application oriented. Main goal is to investigate the applicability of modern systems, imaging and control methods to practical situations in the area of robotics. Robot application areas we investigate are: inspection robotics (UAVs, UGVs, UUVs); medical robotics (assistance to surgeons, diagnostics); service robotics (street cleaning, service to people).The science and engineering topics we work on are: modeling and simulation of physical systems; intelligent control; robotic actuators; computer vision and medical imaging; embedded control systems. In our labs we have quite a variety of robotic setups: basic 1 or 2 motor systems, precise motion control platforms, a production cell-like block circulator, several types of flying wheeled mobile robots, humanoid walking robots, and setups for robotized needle insertion.

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IRI

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The Institut de Robòtica i Informàtica Industrial (IRI), is a Joint University Research Institute participated by the Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC) and the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) that conducts basic and applied research in human-centered robotics and automatic control.The IRI offers access to scientific-technological areas included in the Barcelona Robot Lab (BRL) (http://www.iri.upc.edu/research/webprojects/barcelonarobotlab/) for doing outdoor/indoor experiments in mobile robotics and human-robot interaction and collaboration. The BRL includes an outdoor pedestrian area of 10.000sqm in the north UPC campus and an indoor area of 80sqm with Optitrack installation. The BRL allows to experiment in public spaces deploying robots in a real and controlled urban scenarios to perform navigation and human robot interaction and collaboration experiments with end users and participants. The Barcelona Robot Lab offers moreover a simulation software package with a 2D/3D scenario view, where any experiment can be validated before doing real-life experiments, and technical support along the experimentation process.

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Robotics, Vision and Control Group

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The Robotics, Vision and Control Group (GRVC, https://grvc.us.es/) is one of the most relevant laboratories in aerial robotics. GRVC is currently composed of more than 75 members with heterogeneous and synergetic engineering background and skills (aeronautics,  mechatronics, computer science, telecommunication, electronics, mechanical engineering) with long tradition in aerial robotics. In the last 10 years the GRVC researchers have led or participated in more than 75 projects in a variety of topics , including 20 Framework Program European projects (leading 5) and receiving more than 21 Million euros of external funding. Currently, it is participating in 13 active H2020 projects.The GRVC head, Anibal Ollero, has recently obtained the European Research Council (ERC) Advanced Grant GRIFFIN (General compliant aerial Robotic manipulation system Integrating Fixed and Flapping wings to increase range and safety) on new aerial robotic systems with unprecedented flying, perching and manipulation capabilities.In the last 5 years the GRVC members of the Group have authored more than 170 publications, including about 60 papers in SCR Journals. Moreover, the members of the Group have authored or edited 20 books.The GRVC researchers have been distinguished with 19 national and international awards. In the last 10 years the GRVC has presented 16 Thesis that have obtained 6 awards up to now.The most important fields of research and innovation of the group, funded by the European Comission, companies, the Spanish Research Programme and Regional Research Programme, are:
  • Aerial Robotics
  • Unmanned and Autonomous Vehicles and Systems
  • Robotics for aircraft manufacturing and other manufacturing applications
  • Distributed systems and wireless sensors and actuator networks

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Laboratory of Intelligent Systems

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The Laboratory of Intelligent Systems takes inspiration from nature to design artificial intelligence and robots that are soft, fly, or evolve their own behaviors. Main research areas are the followings:Aerial RoboticsWe design flying robots, or drones, with rich sensory and behavioural abilities that can change morphology to smoothly and safely operate in different environments. These drones are conceived to work cooperatively and with humans to power civil applications in transportation, aerial mapping, agriculture, search-and-rescue, and augmented virtual reality.Evolutionary RoboticsEvolutionary robotics takes inspiration from natural evolution to automatically design robot bodies and brains (neural networks) and to understand evolution of living systems. Topics of interest include open-ended evolution, evolution of social cooperation and competition, evolution of communication, evolution of multi-cellular robots, evolvable hardware.Soft RoboticsSoft robots can continuously change their shape, withstand strong mechanical forces, and passively adapt to their environment. The “softness” makes these robots safer and potentially more robust and versatile than their counterparts made of bolts and metal. Examples include soft grippers that manipulate complex shapes without complex software and insect-inspired compound eyes that conform to curved surfaces to provide large fields of views. Soft robotics technologies will find applications in mobile robotics, in wearable robotics, and in many other applications such as manufacturing, rehabilitation, and portable intelligent devices.Wearable RoboticsWe investigate and develop novel soft wearable robots, or exosuits, for natural interaction between humans and robots and for novel forms of augmented reality.Traditional human-robot interaction often requires funnelling rich sensory-motor information through simplified computer interfaces, such as visual displays and joysticks, that demand cognitive effort. Instead, we need novel embodied interactions where humans and machines feel each other throughout the extension of their bodies and their rich sensory channels. We want to enable human experience of non-anthropomorphic morphologies and behaviors, such as flying, and novel forms of augmented reality through wearable robotics technologies.

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BioRobotics Lab

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The Biorobotics Laboratory (BioRob in short) is part of the Institute of Bioengineering in the School of Engineering at the EPFL. We work on the computational aspects of locomotion control, sensorimotor coordination, and learning in animals and in robots. We are interested in using robots and numerical simulation to study the neural mechanisms underlying movement control and learning in animals, and in return to take inspiration from animals to design new control methods for robotics as well as novel robots capable of agile locomotion in complex environments.Our research interests are therefore at the intersection between robotics, computational neuroscience, nonlinear dynamical systems, and machine learning. We carry out research projects in the following areas: neuromechanical simulations of locomotion and movement control, systems of coupled nonlinear oscillators for locomotion control, adaptive dynamical systems, design and control of amphibious, legged, and reconfigurable robots, control of humanoid robots and of exoskeletons.

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Bristol Robotics Laboratory

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Bristol Robotics Laboratory (BRL) is the most comprehensive academic centre for multi-disciplinary robotics research in the UK. It is a collaborative partnership between the University of the West of England and the University of Bristol, and home to a vibrant community of over 200 academics, researchers and industry practitioners. Together, they are world leaders in current thinking on service robotics, intelligent autonomous systems and bio-engineering. An internationally recognized Centre of Excellence in Robotics, BRL’s state-of- the-art facilities cover an area of over 4,600 sq. metres. BRL houses around 200 people engaged on a range of robotics research and development projects. Currently seventeen themes form the key areas of work. These include: Aerial robots, Assisted Living, Bioenergy & Self Sustainable, Biomimetic and neuro-robotics, Control for HRI, Medical robotics, Nonlinear control in robotics, Robot vision, Safe human robot interaction, Self-repairing robotic systems, Smart automation, Soft robotics, Swarm robotics, Unconventional computation, Verification & validation. BRL is equipped with a number of robots ranging from a traditional 60kg payload KUKA KR60 to two twin arm YUMIs and a number of Universal robots and KUKA Light weight arms. There is also a machine shop and a 3D printing facility with a number of machines. The laboratory includes a machine vision group and has significant projects in the area of autonomous vehicles. The comprehensively equipped indoors flying arena if one of the largest in Europe.

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Robotics Innovation Facility

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The Robotics Innovation Facility (RIF) is a European funded programme that brings researchers and industry in direct contact with current and new users of robotic technologies. RIFs are open to the public labs, which provide state-of-the-art robotic hardware and software, as well as scientific and technical support. Anticipating market trends, the RIFs cover a wide range of application areas. Located within BRL, the RIF@Bristol covers an area of circa 100 m2 and is equipped with a number of robots, vision systems and other items of automation. Three dedicated personnel service the RIF and support its offerings with additional assistance provided by the BRL technical support team and other engineers and scientists employed in the laboratory as and when required. The Bristol RIF will provide access to equipment and expertise to assist with:

  • Estimating and analysing market size for new products, services or a processes
  • Design of novel end-effectors and sensors
  • Proof of concept demonstrations in novel robot application areas
  • Integration of robotic systems in manufacturing, health, training, entertainment etc.
  • Human/machine interface and robot programing
  • Requirement analysis and concept demonstration in the field of Assisted Living and Medical Robotics
  • Application and demonstration of robotics in agriculture, horticulture and food production
Bristol RIF is currently running a series of Beta trials including participants from startup companies in gaming and entertainment, established consumer product companies and educational establishments.The projects have addressed areas of end-effector design and proof of concept, assistance with design of controller for gaming robots, preparation of parts for teaching robots etc. The Beta trials will test the various interfaces with the potential clients, liaisons, definition of performance metrics, scheduling etc.As part of our continued dialogue with potential new users of robotics and automation, a number of workshops will be presented over the next five years including Mechatronics, Robotics, Intellectual Property and Finance.

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Ambient Assisted Living Laboratory

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Mobile robots, working in conjunction with smart sensors, offer proactive initiative to prompt and support a person wherever they are, offering increased availability, awareness and access, as compared to a static system. A robot as the interface also has the potential to offer a more social and entertaining interaction experience. The use of voice and gesture recognition, speech synthesis and sensor information from ambient intelligent environments and smart garments, enable a robotic assistive system to offer more natural interactions. At the BRL, the Anchor Robotics Personalised Assisted Living Studio is an in-house facility to develop, test and implement assistive robots and heterogeneous sensor systems in a realistic environment, bringing together our expertise in robotics, human-robot interaction, intelligent learning systems and person-centred design. This helps to ensure real-world applicability of our research and can help in reducing the time to get these innovative technologies to market. A person-centred approach is adopted: understanding people’s context of use and perspectives on robotic assistive technology; investigating potential barriers and constraints and criteria for acceptability; considering ethical issues and social and cultural impact of the technology. A key aspect of the research into Assistive Robotics is developing contextual and social intelligence for the robot to interact appropriately, safely, and reliably in real-time. The aim is to develop robust and intelligent assistive robots by incorporating both environmental and user characteristics, and behaviour as part of the overall control system architecture.

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The Hamlyn Centre

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The facility at the Hamlyn Centre for Robotic Surgery consists of state-of-the-art robotic platforms and manufacturing/characterisation devices for the development and construction of the next generation of robotic devices. The Hamlyn Centre makes its robot development facilities, infrastructure and expertise available to institution, local, national the international research communities. The Surgical Robot Challenge is an international annual competition that is organised by the Hamlyn Centre that sees 10 teams come each year from leading robotics institutions around the world to London, to demonstrate their surgical robot innovations to leaders and pioneers of the fields of robotics and surgery. Each team makes use of the unique facilities, infrastructure and expertise in the Hamlyn Centre in the months leading up to the competition and during the competition finals. The Hamlyn Centre also runs Summer and Winter Schools on surgical robotics that each see up to 30 researchers from around the world utilising the equipment and knowhow of the Hamlyn Centre. Furthermore, the Hamlyn Centre runs a leading conference in Medical Robotics called the Hamlyn Symposium, now entering its 11th year that is supported by the unique facilities of the Hamlyn Centre for running surgical robotics demos and hands-on workshops.